TITLE

Mastery in College

AUTHOR(S)
Dolch, Edward William
PUB. DATE
March 1934
SOURCE
Journal of Higher Education;Mar1934, Vol. 5 Issue 3, p121
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on a study about attaining mastery at college level. It has long been recognized that nothing short of mastery of a subject should be tolerated at the university level, but the problem has been how to secure it. The other principle is that of adaptation to individual differences. It has been felt that application of this principle would require sectioning, tutoring, honors courses, or the like, but the experiment to be described shows that adaptation to individual differences can, in large degree, be achieved with the usual college organization. The principle of mastery is simply that no work is done until it is done right. In a course in educational psychology this principle of mastery was applied. The usual method is to return unsatisfactory papers marked "poor" or "failure." In contrast, the method of requiring mastery described in this article did not result in a high percentage of failures in the course. The article provides material for individual differences only in giving more time and opportunity for the poorer or slower part of the group, but provision was also made for the upper end, or the better students.
ACCESSION #
19194411

 

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