TITLE

First Woman South African Ambassador Meets With JET/EBONY Editorial Board

PUB. DATE
June 1999
SOURCE
Jet;06/07/99, Vol. 96 Issue 1, p4
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Highlights the visit of South African Ambassador Sheila Violet Makate to the United States. Her views on the politics and government of her country; Her views on the historic relations between South Africans and African-Americans; Companies that she toured during her visit.
ACCESSION #
1915537

 

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