TITLE

ALASKA'S RIVERS: YUKON REGION: SHEENJEK RIVER

PUB. DATE
January 1993
SOURCE
Alaska River Guide (9780882404974);1993, p139
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents information on the Sheenjek River in Alaska. Traversing a vast wilderness just south of the Arctic Divide, the river offers an opportunity to experience several arctic ecosystems while paddling through a wild, remote region. The Sheenjek begins as a swift mountain stream, rising from glaciers on the southern flanks of the eastern Brooks Range, and flows south for more than 240 miles before emptying into the Porcupine River 40 miles above Fort Yukon. The gradient increases as the river narrows and picks up speed again, splitting into braided channels and oxbows with broad gravel bars. The Sheenjek was a major north-south travel and trade route between Gwich'in Athapaskans and Eskimos because it was a natural travel route over the Arctic Divide.
ACCESSION #
19117146

 

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