TITLE

ALASKA'S RIVERS: NORTHWEST ALASKA: AMBLER RIVER

PUB. DATE
January 1993
SOURCE
Alaska River Guide (9780882404974);1993, p71
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents information on the Ambler River in Northwest Alaska. It rises from the Schwatka Mountains of the Brooks Range at Nakmaktuak Pass and flows in a southwesterly direction for 80 miles to its confluence with the Kobuk River. The river is a single channel for the first 15 miles from the confluence of two headwater forks, with many small rapids flowing over sharp rocks. It passes through a narrow, constricted valley with steep mountains on the right bank. In its midsection is a forested valley that broadens. The river is shallow and braided for about 35 miles before becoming a single channel once again a mile above Lake Anirak. And from this point, it meanders 30 miles through a broad floodplain to its confluence with the Kobuk at the Eskimo village of Ambler.
ACCESSION #
19117120

 

Related Articles

  • NATIONAL WILD AND SCENIC RIVERS.  // Alaska Almanac;2011, Issue 33, p158 

    The article offers information on national wild and scenic rivers in Alaska. The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980 provided wild and scenic river classification to 13 streams within the National Park System, six in the National Wildlife Refuge System and two in Bureau of...

  • ALASKA'S RIVERS.  // Alaska River Guide (9780882404974);1993, p57 

    The article deals with the rivers in Alaska. There are six distinct river drainage regions that define Alaska, namely, the Arctic Slope, Northwest, Yukon, Southwest, Southcentral, and Southeast. Within these are 12 major river systems namely, the Colville, Noatak, Kohuk, Yukon, Tanana, Koyukuk,...

  • NATIONAL WILD AND SCENIC RIVERS.  // Alaska Almanac;2005, Issue 29, p148 

    The article provides information on Alaska's national wild and scenic rivers. The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980 gave wild and scenic river classification to 13 streams within the National Park System, six in the National Wildlife Refuge System and two in Bureau of Land...

  • NATIONAL WILD AND SCENIC RIVERS AND STATE RECREATION RIVERS.  // Alaska River Guide (9780882404974);1993, p280 

    This article presents information on the national wild and scenic rivers and state recreation rivers in Alaska. Twenty-five Alaskan rivers are protected under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1980, which is designated to keep rivers free-flowing and to guard water quality, scenery,...

  • THE CIMARRON. Love, Chad // Oklahoma Today;Jan/Feb2005, Vol. 55 Issue 1, p46 

    The article focuses on the scenic beauty of the river Cimarron in Oklahoma. As it flows through Oklahoma from west to east, the Cimarron passes through four of the major physiographic ecoregions of Oklahoma: the high plains in the Panhandle, the southwestern tablelands in the far northwest, the...

  • Oregon surprise. Terrill, Steve // Sunset;Aug2000, Vol. 205 Issue 2, p176 

    Describes the Chalk Basin stretch of the Owhyee River in eastern Oregon. Explorer who named the river; Attractions; Flora and fauna at the wilderness area.

  • NIOBRARA RIVER IS SAFE AT LAST.  // Audubon;Sep/Oct91, Vol. 93 Issue 5, p127 

    Reports on the U.S. Congress' designation of a portion of the Niobrara River in Nebraska as 'scenic' under the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. Protection of the river's ecological and scenic values from dams and development; Preservation of working landscapes through the imaginative use of...

  • NATIONAL WILD AND SCENIC RIVERS.  // Alaska Almanac;2006, Issue 30, p149 

    The article presents an encyclopedia entry for Alaska's national wild and scenic rivers. The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980 gave wild and scenic river classification to 13 streams within the National Park System, six in the National Wildlife Refuge System and two in the...

  • ALASKA'S RIVERS: YUKON REGION: BEAVER CREEK.  // Alaska River Guide (9780882404974);1993, p100 

    The article presents information on the Beaver Creek in the Yukon Territory. It offers an excellent family or novice float and is one of the few road-accessible streams in Alaska designated as a Wild and Scenic River. The river originates at the confluence of Bear and Champion creeks in White...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics