TITLE

Friendship-Facilitation Strategies: What Do Students in Middle School Tell Us?

PUB. DATE
November 2005
SOURCE
Teaching Exceptional Children;Nov/Dec2005, Vol. 38 Issue 2, p52
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents information on the concepts of friendship for students with disabilities during the middle school years. During this time friends provide each other the support that may have been previously given by their own family. But usually friendship between them and normal students do not occur. In a study, students were asked about their friendships with peers with disabilities and the strategies that could be used to facilitate friendships between students with and without disabilities. Most of the students talked about strategies for teaching and other students that might encourage friendships between students with and without disabilities. They made the suggestion that teachers need to discuss it in classrooms about some of the specific characteristics of peers with disabilities so that they would understand the reasons for the occurrence of some different behaviors. They also expressed that instead of enacting a plan to pair a disabled student with one student, it would be better if the student with disabilities could be included in a group of students who consider each other to be friends. INSETS: Peer Suggestions for Teacher Facilitation Strategies.;What Does the Literature Say Aboutߪ.;Peer Suggestions for Student Facilitationߪ..
ACCESSION #
19053824

 

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