TITLE

FTC asked to drop antitrust suit against large oil firms

AUTHOR(S)
Choudhury, Pravat
PUB. DATE
February 1982
SOURCE
Marketing News;2/5/1982, Vol. 15 Issue 16, p12
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the drop of a long-standing antitrust suit against large oil firms in the U.S. This action by the Federal Trade Commission's Bureau of Competition's prosecutors should be a welcoming move for the marketing people who are concerned about unrealistic regulatory interference. The case was filed against the Gulf Oil, Mobil Oil, Standard Oil of California, Standard Oil of Indiana, Shell Oil, and Atlantic Richfield. These companies were charged with monopolistic practices and possible price conspiracy. The Bureau of Competition recommended that drastic change in the petroleum industry have resulted in the drop of the suit.
ACCESSION #
18988232

 

Related Articles

  • 'Banned' Alt Medicine TV Pitchman Sues FTC. Edwards, Jim // Brandweek;3/21/2005, Vol. 46 Issue 12, p15 

    Reports on a lawsuit filed by marketer Kevin Trudeau against the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC), as of March 2005. Allegations that the agency issued a defamatory press release against Trudeau; Background of the decision of the FTC to ban Trudeau from selling health-related products in...

  • Federal Trade Commission opposes ASAE's amicus brief.  // Association Management;Nov96, Vol. 48 Issue 11, p7 

    Reports on the opposition of the United States Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to the amicus curiae brief, which the American Society of Association Executives (ASAE) submitted in September 1996. Brief submitted on behalf of the California Dental Association; Appeal of the FTC decision...

  • 2 tribally operated Okla. loan companies subject of lawsuit.  // Native American Times;4/13/2012, Vol. 18 Issue 15, p1 

    The article reports on the lawsuit filed by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission against two loan firms on April 2012, which operated by the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and the Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma, alleging illegal operation.

  • Federal, state charges target direct-marketing fraud. Myers, Laura L.; Takemoto, Paul // Travel Agent;3/25/96, Vol. 279 Issue 4, p144 

    Reports on the lawsuit filed against five companies in Florida by the Federal Trade Commission in relation to corrupt practices. Companies named; Circumstances surrounding the case.

  • FTC takes on D&B's acquisition of QED citing competition in education data. McKeefery, Kevin // DM News;5/17/2010, p4 

    The article reports on the lawsuit filed by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) against the database company Dun & Bradstreet Corp. regarding the alleged antitrust law violation of the company as a result of its acquisition of the Quality Education Data (QED).

  • US Supreme Court to Hear Pay-for-Delay Case. Markarian, Jennifer // BioPharm International;Jan2013, Vol. 26 Issue 1, p8 

    The article discusses the U.S. Supreme Court case of the U.S. Federal Trade Commission vs. Watson Pharmaceuticals Inc. et al. which deals with the "pay-for-delay" arrangement of brand-name drug companies that violates the antitrust laws.

  • TAKING ACTION AGAINST MTV's JERSEY SHORE.  // Skin Cancer Foundation Journal;2013, Vol. 31, p10 

    The article reports that in January 2013, the Skin Cancer Foundation filed a complaint with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to investigate MTV's promotion of tanning through its Jersey Shore television series.

  • III. REGULATION OF PRICE COMPETITION. Werner, Ray O.; Howard, Marshall C. // Journal of Marketing;Jul1963, Vol. 27 Issue 3, p85 

    The article presents information on legal developments in marketing relative to the regulation of price competition. One of these developments describes the case of Federal Trade Commission v. Sun Oil Company, in which the court ruled that a gas supplier cannot force an independently-owned...

  • My Memorable Experiences as a Marketing Academic at the Federal Trade Commission. Wilkie, William L. // Journal of Public Policy & Marketing;Fall2014, Vol. 33 Issue 2, p194 

    In this article the author shares his experience while working as a marketing academic at the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics