TITLE

Saccade impairments in patients with fronto-temporal dementia

AUTHOR(S)
Meynuel, C.; Rivaud-Péchoux, S.; Damier, P.; Gaymard, B.
PUB. DATE
November 2005
SOURCE
Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry;Nov2005, Vol. 76 Issue 11, p1581
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background: Early diagnosis of fronto-temporal dementia (FTD) is often difficult because of the non-specific presentation. Saccadic eye movements, which are mainly controlled by the frontal areas, may provide a powerful tool for the analysis of fontal lobe dysfunction. The pattern of saccadic abnormalities has not previously been investigated in patients with FTD. Oblective: To study saccade tasks in a group of 23 patients with FTD and compare the results with aged matched healthy controls. Methods: Triggering and inhibition of reflexive prosaccades were evaluated in a prosaccade and an antisaccade task, respectively, while the ability to withhold an antisaccade during a delay was explored in a delayed antisaccade task. Patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), in whom the pattern of eye movement deficit is well documented, were studied with the same protocol. To characterise the frontal lobe dysfunction in FTD more precisely, a battery of neuropsychological tests was carried out in these patients. Results: Patients with FTD showed impaired reflexive saccade inhibition, similar to that observed in patients with PSP, and a decreased ability to withhold an antisaccade. Conclusions: Inhibition of reflexive and voluntary saccades appears to be independently processed. A delayed anti-saccade task could be useful for the early diagnosis of FTD.
ACCESSION #
18972071

 

Related Articles

  • Have a look at eye movements. Strupp, Michael // Journal of Neurology;Sep2006, Vol. 253 Issue 9, p1248 

    The article introduces a series of articles in the field of ocular motor disorders and eye movements. They include "Identification of an ocular motor biomarker of preclinical Huntington disease by examination of saccades," "Glucose utilization in the inferior cerebellar vermis and ocular...

  • Distribution of astrocytic plaques in the corticobasal degeneration brain and comparison with tuft-shaped astrocytes in the progressive supranuclear palsy brain. Hattori, Manabu; Hashizume, Yoshio; Yoshida, Mari; Iwasaki, Yasushi; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Ueda, Ryuzo; Ojika, Kosei // Acta Neuropathologica;Aug2003, Vol. 106 Issue 2, p143 

    Corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) have some clinical and pathological features in common. Each, however, has been shown to have specific astrocytic inclusions. CBD is characterized by astrocytic plaques, and PSP is characterized by tuft-shaped astrocytes....

  • Willpower and Conscious Percept: Volitional Switching in Binocular Rivalry. Hugrass, Laila; Crewther, David // PLoS ONE;Apr2012, Vol. 7 Issue 4, p1 

    When dissimilar images are presented to the left and right eyes, awareness switches spontaneously between the two images, such that one of the images is suppressed from awareness while the other is perceptually dominant. For over 170 years, it has been accepted that even though the periods of...

  • Willpower and Conscious Percept: Volitional Switching in Binocular Rivalry. Hugrass, Laila; Crewther, David // PLoS ONE;Apr2012, Vol. 7 Issue 4, p1 

    When dissimilar images are presented to the left and right eyes, awareness switches spontaneously between the two images, such that one of the images is suppressed from awareness while the other is perceptually dominant. For over 170 years, it has been accepted that even though the periods of...

  • What is pathological with gaze shift fragmentation in Parkinson's disease? Kimmig, Hubert; Haußmann, Katja; Mergner, Thomas; Lücking, Carl H. // Journal of Neurology;Jun2002, Vol. 249 Issue 6, p683 

    Oculomotor dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD) is mainly characterized by a fragmentation of memory-guided gaze shifts (target is reached by several hypometric saccades). Since this phenomenon can also be observed in normal subjects, we scrutinized its pathophysiological significance in PD...

  • Eye–head coordination in moderately affected Huntington’s Disease patients: do head movements facilitate gaze shifts? Becker, W.; Jürgens, R.; Kassubek, J.; Ecker, D.; Kramer, B.; Landwehrmeyer, B. // Experimental Brain Research;Jan2009, Vol. 192 Issue 1, p97 

    In addition to many other symptoms, Huntington’s Disease (HD) also causes an impairment of oculomotor functions. In particular, saccadic eye movements become progressively slower and more difficult to initiate; ultimately, patients are forced to recur to large head thrusts as means to...

  • The role of the ventrolateral frontal cortex in inhibitory oculomotor control. Tim Hodgson; Marcia Chamberlain; Benjamin Parris; Martin James; Nicholas Gutowski; Masud Husain; Christopher Kennard // Brain: A Journal of Neurology;Jun2007, Vol. 130 Issue 6, p1525 

    It has been proposed that the inferior/ventrolateral frontal cortex plays a critical role in the inhibitory control of action during cognitive tasks. However, the contribution of this region to the control of eye movements has not been clearly established. Here, we describe the performance of a...

  • Contrast Dependence of Smooth Pursuit Eye Movements following a Saccade to Superimposed Targets. Fallah, Mazyar; Reynolds, John H. // PLoS ONE;May2012, Vol. 7 Issue 5, p1 

    Dorsal stream areas provide motion information used by the oculomotor system to generate pursuit eye movements. Neurons in these areas saturate at low levels of luminance contrast. We therefore hypothesized that during the early phase of pursuit, eye velocity would exhibit an oculomotor gain...

  • An anatomical landmark for the supplementary eye fields in human revealed with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Grosbras, M-H; Lobel, E; Van de Moortele, P-F; LeBihan, D; Berthoz, A // Cerebral Cortex;Oct99, Vol. 9 Issue 7, p705 

    Together with the frontal and parietal eye fields, the supplementary eye field (SEF) is involved in the performance and control of voluntary and reflexive saccades and of ocular pursuit. This region was first described in non-human primates and is rather well localized on the dorsal surface of...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sign out of this library

Other Topics