TITLE

Biochemistry -- Trace Elements

AUTHOR(S)
McGlannan, Frances; Maugh, II, Thomas H.
PUB. DATE
April 1974
SOURCE
Journal of Learning Disabilities;Apr1974, Vol. 7 Issue 4, p210
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article focuses on the effects of trace elements on humans. Scientists have for some time recognized that trace concentrations of certain elements, such as iron and zinc, are essential to human metabolism; that other elements, such as lead and cadmium, are toxic at similar concentrations; and that still others, such as selenium, can be both beneficial and toxic within a fairly narrow range of concentrations. The time may be fast approaching when evaluation of trace element concentrations will play a fundamental role in the diagnosis of illness. The detrimental effects of certain trace elements and their derivatives have become very well known. Lead and methylmercury, for example, have been shown to damage the central nervous system. Many trace elements are beneficial. At the latest count, 14 different trace elements have been identified as essential to human health. Cobalt, zinc and manganese serve as cofactors for various metabolic enzymes, and iron is an integral component of hemoglobin. Concentrations of the various elements are closely interconnected in human physiology, and there is growing evidence that at least some effects of toxic trace elements result not so much from inherent toxicity of the elements as from their interference with the function of other elements.
ACCESSION #
18962860

 

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