TITLE

How to Handle Death in the School

AUTHOR(S)
Stevenson, Robert G.; Powers, Harry L.
PUB. DATE
May 1987
SOURCE
Education Digest;May1987, Vol. 52 Issue 9, p42
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses how to handle death in schools. When one considers that each year one out of every 750 young people will die or be killed, the urgency of establishing a procedure for informing students of "bad news" becomes obvious. Young people are looking for models or standards for their behavior in times of grief and, as in the case of many other social and emotional situations, it is the educational system that must often supply the solution. The student should be told by someone who is trusted and seen as an authority figure. The principal is often the logical choice. Someone close to the student should be asked to remain with the student after the news is received. The student should be told what has happened quietly, simply, and directly. Platitudes or religious symbolism should be avoided. Unnecessary details should not be offered, but all questions must be answered directly and honestly. One should not be afraid to speak about feelings and emotions; this can help the student to sort out confusing reactions and to see the school in a supporting role.
ACCESSION #
18692290

 

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