TITLE

The astonished Iroquois never knew what hit them-- French explorer Samuel de Champlain

AUTHOR(S)
Hessney, Stuart A.
PUB. DATE
November 2005
SOURCE
Military History;Nov2005, Vol. 22 Issue 8, p16
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article describes the role of French adventurer Samuel de Champlain in the Iroquois Indian and Canadian Indian war on July 30, 1609 in Canada. The Algonquin, Huron and Montagnais tribes asked Champlain to assist them against their mortal enemies, the Five Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy, during the summer of 1609. In exchange for military assistance, the Indians promised to provide Champlain with geographic information about the Northwest Passage to Asia. Champlain, accompanied by just two French companions, joined 60 native warriors as they paddled south in 24 canoes that July.
ACCESSION #
18639331

 

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