TITLE

120 mm Pop-&-Scoot Mortars

AUTHOR(S)
Biass, Eric H.
PUB. DATE
October 2005
SOURCE
Armada International;Oct/Nov2005, Vol. 29 Issue 5, p28
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Introduces a turret called Amos jointly developed by Finnish company Patria and Swedish company Hägglunds, as of October 2005. Pros and cons of turrets; History of turrets; Key features of the turret developed by the two companies.
ACCESSION #
18611175

 

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