TITLE

SPEECH AND DIPLOMACY

AUTHOR(S)
Simpson, R. Smith
PUB. DATE
April 1957
SOURCE
Today's Speech;Apr1957, Vol. 5 Issue 2, p13
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article focuses on the importance of speech in diplomacy. How much better it might be if man were deprived of his ability to speak--or if, at least, this unique gift of articulation were more justly prized and more judiciously used. For what one says can be helpful or destructive, reconciling or dividing, healing or wounding. Those of us dealing with international developments have especial reason to appreciate this for an utterance of international interest has a trajectory of an awe-inspiring scale. Just let some piece of nonsense issue from a human muzzle and off it goes, like an unguided missile, on a tingling journey to the furthermost corners of the earth, working a withering havoc before settling to earth, like Longfellow's arrow, one knows not where. In its course, it sets up equally tingling reactions, startling long-dormant opinions, prejudices and emotions from a peaceful sleep, until sometimes one hardly knows where or how to begin to grapple with its effects. It is for this reason that some participants in international relations have turned for consolation to a more distant, less disconcerting age when international relations were conducted if not by clucks and grunts, at least by measured words.
ACCESSION #
18592260

 

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