TITLE

The commercial impact of Katrina

PUB. DATE
October 2005
SOURCE
Pest Control;Oct2005, Vol. 73 Issue 10, p24
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on the release of an imagery-derived assessment of zones in Louisiana and Mississippi damaged by high winds and flood resulting from hurricane Katrina by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Number of businesses in the two areas designated as flooded or damaged areas or both; Number of affected workers; Post-hurricane condition in Mississippi.
ACCESSION #
18585668

 

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