TITLE

The precision of longitudinal lung function measurements: monitoring and interpretation

AUTHOR(S)
Hnizdo, E.; Yu, L.; Freyder, L.; Attfield, M.; Lefante, J.; Glindmeyer, H. W.
PUB. DATE
October 2005
SOURCE
Occupational & Environmental Medicine;Oct2005, Vol. 62 Issue 10, p695
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background: The efficacy of decision making based on longitudinal spirometric measurements depends critically on the precision of the available data, which is determined by the magnitude of the within-person variation. Aims: Firstly, to describe and investigate two statistical methods—a pairwise estimate of within-person standard deviation sp and the reliability coefficient G—for use in the monitoring of precision of longitudinal measurements of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). Secondly, to investigate the effect of longitudinal data precision on the detectable excess rate of decline in FEV1. Methods: The authors "monitored" retrospectively on a yearly basis the magnitude of the within-person variation sp and the coefficient G in 11 workplace based spirometric monitoring programmes conducted from 1987 to 2001 on 12 729 workers in various industrial plants. Results: The plant-specific mean values sp (range 122-166 ml) and G (range 0.88-0.95), averaged over all years of follow up, correlated well with the plant-specific within-person standard deviation sp (range 130-177 ml) estimated from all longitudinal data. The correlations were 0.90 for sp and 0.68 for G. The average precision of the longitudinal FEV1 measurements affected the duration of follow up needed to identify a "true" excess rate of decline in FEV1 in an individual. Conclusions: The results show that monitoring of longitudinal spirometry data precision (1) allows that data precision can be improved or maintained at levels that allow individuals with a rapid decline to be identified at an earlier age; and (2) attaches a measure of precision to the data on which decision making is based.
ACCESSION #
18502039

 

Related Articles

  • Limits of longitudinal decline for the interpretation of annual changes in FEV1 in individuals. Hnizdo, Eva; Sircar, Kanta; Tieliang Yan; Harber, Philip; Fleming, James; Glindmeyer, Henry W. // Occupational & Environmental Medicine;Oct2007, Vol. 64 Issue 10, p701 

    Objective: Spirometry-based screening programmes often conduct annual assessment of longitudinal changes in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) to identify individuals with excessive rates of decline. Both the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and the American College of Occupational and...

  • Longitudinal Study Of Peak Expiratory Flow Rate In Pregnant Women. Bansal, Monika; Goyal, Manoj; Dhillon, Jasjeet Kaur; Kaur, Parmjit // National Journal of Integrated Research in Medicine;2012, Vol. 3 Issue 1, p34 

    Background: Several changes have been reported in the maternal pulmonary function tests during pregnancy. A longitudinal study was undertaken to document these changes throughout pregnancy using Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR). Effect of age and height on PEFR was also documented. Method :The...

  • Author's response: understanding the natural progression in %FEV1 decline in patients with cystic fibrosis: a longitudinal study. Taylor-Robinson, David; Whitehead, Margaret; Diderichsen, Finn; Olesen, Hanne Vebert; Pressler, Tania; Smyth, Rosalind; Diggle, Peter // Thorax;Mar2013, Vol. 68 Issue 3, p294 

    A response from the author of the article "Understanding the natural progression in %FEV1 decline in patients with cystic fibrosis: a longitudinal study" in the 2012 issue, which discusses repeated measurement of lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis, is presented.

  • Screening for asthma in Cantonese-speaking immigrant children. Greenfield, Robyn O.; Lee, Angela C.; Tang, Roland; Brugge, Doug // BMC Public Health;2005, Vol. 5 Issue 1, p48 

    Background: Asthma prevalence among Chinese immigrant children is poorly understood and attempts to screen these children have produced varied outcomes. We sought to learn how to improve screening for asthma in Chinese immigrant children. Methods: Children (n = 152) were administered the Brief...

  • OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE TO WOOD DUST AND HEALTH EFFECTS ON THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM IN A MINOR INDUSTRIAL ESTATE IN BURSA/TURKEY. OSMAN, ERDINÇ; PALA, KAYIHAN // International Journal of Occupational Medicine & Environmental H;Jan2009, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p43 

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to estimate occupational exposure to wood dust in the furniture industry in a minor industrial estate in Bursa/Turkey. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted between October 2006 and May 2007. In this study, a total of 656 persons, 328 woodworkers...

  • Re-Examination of Longitudinal Studies of Workers. Kilburn, Kaye H. // Archives of Environmental Health;May/Jun89, Vol. 44 Issue 3 

    Editorial. Comments on the longitudinal studies of pulmonary function among aluminum workers. Comparison among workers exposed to high, medium, and low levels of potroom air pollutants; Impairment of pulmonary functions among workers from aluminum smelter; Prevalence of respiratory complaints...

  • Workplace sex composition and ischaemic heart disease: A longitudinal analysis using Swedish register data. Barclay, Kieron J; Scott, Kirk // Scandinavian Journal of Public Health;Aug2014, Vol. 42 Issue 6, p525 

    Aims:  The aim of this study is to follow-up on previous research indicating that the sex composition of workplaces is related to a number of health outcomes, including sickness absenteeism and mortality. We test two hypotheses. The first is Kanter’s theory of tokenism, which...

  • "Inclusive working life in Norway": a registry-based five-year follow-up study. Foss, Line; Gravseth, Hans Magne; Kristensen, Petter; Claussen, Bjørgulf; Mehlum, Ingrid Sivesind; Skyberg, Knut // Journal of Occupational Medicine & Toxicology;2013, Vol. 8 Issue 1, p19 

    Background: In 2001, the Norwegian authorities and major labour market partners signed an agreement regarding 'inclusive working life' (IW), whereby companies that participate are committed to reducing sickness absence. Our main aim was to determine the effect of the IW program and work...

  • Framing of task performance strategies: Effects on performance in a multiattribute dynamic... Nygren, Thomas E. // Human Factors;Sep1997, Vol. 39 Issue 3, p425 

    Focuses on a study which examined the impact of the decision making process on the dynamic high-workload environments. Impact of framing on high workload; What was the hypothesis that framing could introduce affective components to the decision making process; Findings of the study.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sign out of this library

Other Topics