TITLE

Soldiers and Heroes

PUB. DATE
September 2005
SOURCE
Scholastic News -- Edition 4;9/5/2005, Vol. 68 Issue 1, p2
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article reports on the departure of U.S. soldiers deployed for peacekeeping in Iraq. The families of soldiers in the U.S. have been giving big hugs, and crying tears of sadness and joy, as many U.S. soldiers have been leaving for Iraq. About 135,000 U.S. troops are in Iraq, including the troops from other countries such as Britain, Australia, and Japan. Foreign soldiers have been in Iraq since 2003 when international forces overthrew former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein.
ACCESSION #
18403519

 

Related Articles

  • Capturing Saddam paves way to peace.  // Fort Worth Business Press;12/19/2003, Vol. 16 Issue 51, p73 

    Comments on the U.S. announcement of the arrest of former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein in December 2003. Recount of the arrest incident; Impact on the people in Iraq; Implications for the U.S.-led war on Iraq.

  • Saddam's secret weapon? Kaplan, David E.; Whitelaw, Kevin // U.S. News & World Report;1/20/2003, Vol. 134 Issue 2, p22 

    The last time that America went to war against Iraq, Saddam Hussein promised to strike America with a wave of worldwide terrorism. U.S. officials fully expect Baghdad to try again should the United States invade Iraq. It is not believed that Iraq has developed terrorist capabilities, and its...

  • Looking on the Bright Side. Zakaria, Fareed // Newsweek (Atlantic Edition);2/3/2003 (Atlantic Edition), Vol. 141 Issue 5, p13 

    Suggests that a U.S. war with Iraq may lead to a major terrorist attack. Consideration of how the Iraqi people would gain liberty and freedom from the oppressive regime of Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein; How the war could affect the price of oil; Political and economic reform in the Arab world.

  • Looking on the Bright Side. Zakaria, Fareed // Newsweek (Pacific Edition);2/3/2003 (Pacific Edition), Vol. 141 Issue 5, p11 

    Suggests that a U.S. war with Iraq may lead to a major terrorist attack. Consideration of how the Iraqi people would gain liberty and freedom from the oppressive regime of Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein; How the war could affect the price of oil; Political and economic reform in the Arab world.

  • Looking on the Bright Side. Zakaria, Fareed // Newsweek;2/3/2003, Vol. 141 Issue 5, p33 

    Suggests that a U.S. war with Iraq may lead to a major terrorist attack. Consideration of how the Iraqi people would gain liberty and freedom from the oppressive regime of Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein; How the war could affect the price of oil; Political and economic reform in the Arab world.

  • Appointment in Baghdad. Buckley Jr., William F. // National Review;1/28/2002, Vol. 54 Issue 1, p16 

    This article focuses on the U.S. offensive against the Baathist regime in Iraq. It will take time and effort for the U.S. to make the anti-Iraqi President Saddam Hussein case to the world so that international resistance is softened up. It is argued that the groundwork for the Iraqi campaign...

  • SORTING THE BAD FROM THE NOT SO BAD. Bennett, Brian; Kucera, Joshua; McCarthy, Terry; Weisskopf, Michael; Thompson, Mark // Time International (South Pacific Edition);5/19/2003, Issue 19, p30 

    The article focuses on the significance for the U.S. to boil down to the right people from the former regime of Iraq in order to be able to bring the nation back to its normal state. Many people joined the Baath Party during the regime of Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein to get ahead in their...

  • Steady On, George. Pryce-Jones, David // National Review;11/25/2002, Vol. 54 Issue 22, p23 

    This article states that if Iraqi President Saddam Hussein survives as dictator of Iraq, power will certainly tilt away from the United States. U.S. President George W. Bush is a supporter of regime change, and freedom and democracy in Iraq. In his address to the United Nations, he spelled out...

  • WAITING FOR WAR. Mazzetti, Mark // U.S. News & World Report;12/16/2002, Vol. 133 Issue 23, p31 

    There is no diplomacy in the desert of Kuwait, only the steady buildup of the weapons of war. Hundreds of miles to the north, United Nations inspectors are methodically searching for Saddam Hussein's weapons of mass destruction, and much of the world still hopes that war can be averted. Yet in...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics