TITLE

Postoperative Outcomes According to Preoperative Medical and Functional Status After Infrainguinal Revascularization for Critical Limb Ischemia in Patients 80 Years and Older

AUTHOR(S)
Taylor, Spence M.; Kalbaugh, Corey A.; Blackhurst, Dawn W.; Langan III, Eugene M.; Cull, David L.; Snyder, Bruce A.; Carsten III, Christopher G.; Jackson, Mark R.; York, John W.; Youkey, Jerry R.
PUB. DATE
August 2005
SOURCE
American Surgeon;Aug2005, Vol. 71 Issue 8, p640
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to provide outcomes after intervention for critical limb ischemia (CLI) in elderly patients (≥80 years) according to medical and functional status at presentation. From January 1998 to September 2003, 140 limbs/122 patients (age range 80-97 years) were treated (57 patients/66 limbs, infrainguinal bypass; 65 patients/74 limbs, infrainguinal angioplasty) for CLI. At presentation, 71 (58.2%) patients were functionally ambulatory, 41 (33.6%) were home-bound ambulators, and 10 (8.2%) were transfer-only ambulators. Overall end points after treatment as well as outcomes according to type of treatment and preoperative medical and functional status were determined. End points included reconstruction patency, limb salvage, survival, amputation-free survival, and maintenance of ambulatory and independent living status. Results for the 140 limbs/122 patients at 3 years (Kaplan-Meier curves) include primary patency, 55.3%; secondary patency, 73.2%; limb salvage, 78.3%; survival, 62.5%; amputation-free survival, 49.7%; maintenance of ambulation, 77.8%; and maintenance of independent living status, 82.9%. There was essentially no difference in outcomes based on type of treatment (endovascular vs open operation). When analyzing 2-year outcomes by functional status (ambulatory vs homebound vs transfer), there was deterioration in outcomes according to declining functional status at presentation for mortality (84.7% vs 66.4% i;s 42%; P < 0.001), amputation-free survival (73.3% vs 48.2% vs 36.9%; P < 0.001), limb salvage (86% vs 66.5% vs 71.9%; P = 0.022), and secondary patency (84.3% vs 61.5% vs 69.2%; P = 0.005) regardless of treatment. Homebound ambulators were two times and transfer-only patients five times more likely to experience death (Cox hazard model); diabetics were four times more likely to lose a limb and experience a decline in ambulation and living status. Overall medical and functional status at presentation predicts postoperative functional outcomes. These data support a policy of aggressive vascular intervention in the functional elderly and clinical restraint in the functionally impaired patient with CLI.
ACCESSION #
18148258

 

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