TITLE

DO EARLY SOCIO-COMMUNICATIVE ABILITIES PREDICT LATER PERSPECTIVE TAKING IN AUTISM? A 3-YEAR FOLLOW-UP STUDY

AUTHOR(S)
Warreyn, Petra; Roeyers, Herbert; Peene, Nathalie; De Groote, Isabel
PUB. DATE
September 2004
SOURCE
Journal of Cognitive & Behavioral Psychotherapies;Sep2004, Vol. 4 Issue 2, p131
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The current study investigated imitation, joint attention, and play as possible precursors of later theory of mind abilities. Twenty children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and twenty age- and IQ- matched control children were tested at time 1, when they were between three and six years old. Three years later, they were invited for a follow-up session. Thirteen children with ASD and six control children participated. The results showed that the longitudinal associations between the abilities were quite different in both groups: In the control group, we found evidence for symbolic imitation, symbolic play and joint attention as precursors of later visual, affective and conceptual perspective taking. None of these associations were found in the ASD group, suggesting a qualitatively different development of social communication in these children. The implications of these findings for theory and practice are discussed.
ACCESSION #
18046387

 

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