TITLE

Corporate transformation

AUTHOR(S)
Coulson-Thomas, Colin
PUB. DATE
June 2005
SOURCE
Management Services;Summer2005, Vol. 49 Issue 2, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article investigates what separates the winners from the losers in corporate transformation. Some companies succeed. They adapt to changing circumstances and remain relevant and vital. Their people manage change, compete and win. Other companies struggle and stagnate. They adopt fashionable approaches and buy the latest technologies. Yet they still fail. Losers are indecisive and oblivious to the needs of others. They are wary of commitments and fail to inspire and motivate. They are also reactive. They respond to events and often fail to anticipate the need to change. Winners in the change, transformation and re-invention stakes are very different. They recognize that change can be stressful and may disrupt valued relationships. They only alter what they need to change, and tell those affected why change is necessary.
ACCESSION #
18011842

 

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