TITLE

Learn About Your New Students

AUTHOR(S)
Byrnes, MaryAnn
PUB. DATE
September 2005
SOURCE
Intervention in School & Clinic;Sep2005, Vol. 41 Issue 1, p13
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article suggests that knowing as much as possible about the new students helps the school year begin smoothly for teachers, students, and parents. According to the author, it is easy to misinterpret a new student's behavior during the first few days. To avoid such misinterpretations, a teacher should conduct a short-term behavior management program. Some students need support throughout the day. Other students experience times of particular stress. Therefore, teachers need to inquire whether the new students require assistance most during independent learning times. Further, it is easy to focus on needs but it is equally important to know areas where a student can work without his teacher. Acknowledging competence and independence communicates confidence in his student. In addition, it is suggested that establishing communications quickly forges a strong school/home partnership. Although it is usually easy to tell when a student is totally frustrated, it is important to ask about behavioral cues that appear before a crisis arrives.
ACCESSION #
17997130

 

Related Articles

  • THE EFFECTS OF INSTRUCTOR SERVICE PERFORMANCE, IMMEDIACY, AND TRUST ON STUDENT-FACULTY OUT-OF-CLASS COMMUNICATION. Faranda, William T. // Marketing Education Review;2015, Vol. 25 Issue 2, p83 

    Student initiated out-of-class communication (OCC) with instructors has been linked to benefits for students, faculty, and the institution at large, yet garners little attention in business education research. Much of the literature found in communication and higher education research has...

  • WHAT DO YOU WHEN A STUDENT ASKS YOU A CONTROVERSIAL QUESTION?  // Middle East Educator;2009, Issue 13, p51 

    The article offers insights from several teachers concerning the situation in which a student asks controversial question to his teacher. One states that she would not give her personal opinion but would show the students the different points of views that the question holds and leave it to them...

  • Real Challenges, Virtual Solutions. MCCABE, CYNTHIA KOPKOWSKI // NEA Today;Mar/Apr2009, Vol. 27 Issue 5, p32 

    The article discusses the use of videoconferencing to teach students in remote areas of Alaska. The author notes that harsh conditions in rural Alaska have led to high teacher turnover. Village classrooms are equipped with screens and a microphone, allowing students to communicate with a teacher...

  • Feedback in an Age of Efficiency. Nichols, T. Philip // Educational Leadership;Sep2012, Vol. 70 Issue 1, p71 

    The article discusses the effect of technology and what the author describes as an obsession with efficiency and objectivity on feedback in education, and offers advice for giving meaningful, individualized feedback to students. The limits of quantitative feedback such as grades in supporting...

  • Children's "Social Betterment.".  // America;11/21/1914, Vol. 12 Issue 6, p147 

    The author advocates the social betterment of children by letting schoolteachers know about their pupils' home lives. A canvass made by some Philadelphia, Pennyslvania teachers showed that pupils who drink beer are those with the poorest conduct in school. The superintendent of schools...

  • The Effects of Teacher-Student Small Talk on Out-of-Seat Behavior. Patterson, Steven T. // Education & Treatment of Children;2/1/2009, Vol. 32 Issue 1, p167 

    This paper presents the results of a function-based study initiated by a general education teacher to reduce a general education student's out- of-seat behavior. Procedures included direct observation, data collection, functional behavior assessment using a Functional Assessment Protocol (FAP;...

  • No Ceiling on Praise. Wilson, Melvin C. // Educational Leadership;Jan1947, Vol. 4 Issue 4, p227 

    Giving credit for good work is such a simple thing to do, according to Melvin C. Wilson, principal, Rigler Elementary School, Portland, Ore., who indicates that a word of praise now and then to adults as well as to children will hardly fall on deaf ears. Mr. Wilson pleads for the kind of...

  • Facilitating conceptual change through modeling in the middle school science classroom. Carrejo, David J.; Reinhartz, Judy // Middle School Journal;Nov2014, Vol. 46 Issue 2, p10 

    This article examines a professional development program that helped teachers use models as a means to foster conceptual change in eighth grade science students and deepen their understanding about motion.

  • Explosive Decompression. Cutler, Ann // Journal of College Science Teaching;Mar/Apr2006, Vol. 35 Issue 5, p4 

    The article reflects on the responsibilities of teachers in educating and disciplining students. It presents ways on how the author helps students accept the requirements of college. It applauds the journal for its useful practicality and its unpretentious readability. It encourages teachers to...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics