TITLE

It's Germans, Not Cubans

AUTHOR(S)
Legum, Colin
PUB. DATE
June 1978
SOURCE
New Republic;6/24/78, Vol. 178 Issue 25, p8
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the foreign policy of the U.S. and France towards Africa. U.S. President Jimmy Carter and French President Giscard d'Estaing proposed in a meeting held in Washington in June that the NATO powers should intervene only when asked by the Africans themselves. They also decided to provide logistical support to a non-existent Pan-African Regional Military Force. The U.S. held responsible Cubans for the recent invasion of Zaire's Shaba province.
ACCESSION #
17873501

 

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