TITLE

A MULTILEVEL MODEL OF RESISTANCE TO INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IMPLEMENTATION

AUTHOR(S)
Lapointe, Liette; Rivard, Suzanne
PUB. DATE
September 2005
SOURCE
MIS Quarterly;Sep2005, Vol. 29 Issue 3, p461
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
To better explain resistance to information technology implementation, we used a multilevel, longitudinal approach. We first assessed extant models of resistance to IT. Using semantic analysis, we identified five basic components of resistance: behaviors, object, subject, threats, and initial conditions. We further examined extant models to (1) carry out a preliminary specification of the nature of the relationships between these components and (2) refine our understanding of the multilevel nature of the phenomenon. Using analytic induction, we examined data from three case studies of clinical information systems implementations in hospital settings, focusing on physicians' resistance behaviors. The resulting mixed-determinants model suggests that group resistance behaviors vary during implementation. When a system is introduced, users in a group will first assess it in terms of the interplay between its features and individual and/or organizational-level initial conditions. They then make projections about the consequences of its use. If expected consequences are threatening, resistance behaviors will result. During implementation, should some trigger occur to either modify or activate an initial condition involving the balance of power between the group and other user groups, it will also modify the object of resistance, from system to system significance. If the relevant initial conditions pertain to the power of the resisting group vis-à-vis the system advocates, the object of resistance will also be modified, from system significance to system advocates. Resistance behaviors will follow if threats are perceived from the interaction between the object of resistance and initial conditions. We also found that the bottom-up process by which group resistance behaviors emerge from individual behaviors is not the same in early versus late implementation. In early implementation, the emergence process is one of compilation, described as a combination of independent, individual behaviors. In later stages of implementation, if group level initial conditions have become active, the emergence process is one of composition, described as the convergence of individual behaviors.
ACCESSION #
17831140

 

Related Articles

  • Technological Advance and Resistance to Change. Atkinson, Philip // Management Services;Sep84, Vol. 28 Issue 9, p16 

    People are approaching a period when most employees will be subject to some sort of change in their work. Due to the silicon revolution and the growth of information processing, the average office worker in commerce and industry will be subjected to radical changes. Office information systems...

  • The Computer as a Small-Group Member. Haines, G.; Heider, F.; Remington, D. // Administrative Science Quarterly;Dec61, Vol. 6 Issue 3, p360 

    This report discusses the introduction of a computer as a group member in a task-oriented group. It demonstrates that such an introduction is actually possible. It also describes some tentative results of the study: organization changes, emotional reactions, some considerations on how to...

  • Managing the Cycle of Change. Craine, Kevin // Information Management Journal;Sep/Oct2007, Vol. 41 Issue 5, p44 

    The article focuses on the change cycle, a four-stage cycle of emotions that individuals are likely to experience when faced with change. It explores why resistance to change is problematic for organizations looking to make changes or implement new technologies. It is stated that resisting...

  • Toward a Characterization of Adaptive Systems: A Framework for Researchers and System Designers. Feigh, Karen M.; Dorneich, Michael C.; Hayes, Caroline C. // Human Factors;Dec2012, Vol. 54 Issue 6, p1008 

    Objective: This article presents a systematic framework characterizing adaptive systems. Background: Adaptive systems are those that can appropriately modify their behavior to fit the current context. This concept is appealing because it offers the possibility of creating computer assistants...

  • DOES INDIVIDUALS' ADOPTION OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES SUPPLEMENT OR SUBSTITUTE FOR INCUMBENT TECHNOLOGIES? INVESTIGATING DISAGGREGATE ADOPTION PATTERNS. OVERBY, ERIC; RANSBOTHAM, SAM // Academy of Management Annual Meeting Proceedings;2010, Vol. 2010 Issue 1, p1 

    The article proposes that individual-level technology adoption be disaggregated into adoption that supplements the incumbent technology and adoption that substitutes for it. A typology of disaggregate adoption patterns was developed, which include augmentation, inverse augmentation, gradual and...

  • CHANGING FRAMES: TOWARDS AN UNDERSTANDING OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE. Gash, Debra C.; Orlikowski, Wanda J. // Academy of Management Best Papers Proceedings;1991, p189 

    A framework, based on users' interpretations of technology, applies the notion of orders of organizational change to the implementation of information technology. This framework allows for the examination of intended and unanticipated modifications to interpretations and uses of information...

  • Using Technology and Constituting Structures: A Practice Lens for Studying Technology in Organizations. Orlikowski, Wanda J. // Organization Science;Jul/Aug2000, Vol. 11 Issue 4, p404 

    As both technologies and organizations undergo dramatic changes in form and function, organizational researchers are increasingly turning to concepts of innovation, emergence, and improvisation to help explain the new ways of organizing and using technology evident in practice. With a similar...

  • What Does Automation Mean to the Marketing Man? Head, G. W. // Journal of Marketing;Apr1960, Vol. 24 Issue 4, p35 

    The subject of automation in business has had extended coverage in the business press during recent months. Electronics has also captured the imagination of marketing men, but the areas for automation have not been clearly defined. This article answers some important questions and gives specific...

  • Keepon keeps on shaking his robotic yellow booty….  // Computer Weekly;4/10/2007, p48 

    The article reports that a team of scientists in Japan have developed a robot that can dance to different tunes. The researchers claim that there innovation will pave the way for machines that can interact more naturally with us humans. The robot, called Keepon, has been programmed to pick out...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics