TITLE

WHILE WE'RE AT IT

AUTHOR(S)
Neuhaus, Richard John
PUB. DATE
February 1998
SOURCE
First Things: A Monthly Journal of Religion & Public Life;Feb1998, Issue 80, p76
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Addresses the an article about judicial misconduct published in the journal "The Long Term View." Views of author David J. Owsiany on the First Things symposium; Distinct governments wherein the people surrendered their power according to author James Madison; Implications of striking down a law merely because it disagrees with its provisions.
ACCESSION #
17777304

 

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