TITLE

WHILE WE'RE AT IT

AUTHOR(S)
Neuhaus, Richard John
PUB. DATE
March 1997
SOURCE
First Things: A Monthly Journal of Religion & Public Life;Mar1997, Issue 71, p62
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Comments on the foreword written by Stephen Carter in the paperback edition of his book "The Culture of Disbelief," which focused on religion. Argument of Carter regarding religion in the public square.
ACCESSION #
17768494

 

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