TITLE

Assisted Suicide: No and Yes, but Mainly Yes

AUTHOR(S)
Hittinger, Russell
PUB. DATE
March 1997
SOURCE
First Things: A Monthly Journal of Religion & Public Life;Mar1997, Issue 71, p8
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Comments on the resistance of the Bill Clinton administration to physician-assisted suicide and the controversy surrounding the issue in the U.S. Declaration of a Washington State law prohibiting physicians from granting patient requests for help in dying as unconstitutional; Information on the Planned Parenthood versus Casey case; Opinion on the filing of briefs against physician-assisted suicide by the American Medical Association.
ACCESSION #
17767084

 

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