TITLE

The End of Democracy? A Discussion Continued

AUTHOR(S)
Dobson, James C.
PUB. DATE
January 1997
SOURCE
First Things: A Monthly Journal of Religion & Public Life;Jan1997, Issue 69, p21
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents views on the judicial usurpation of politics in the U.S. Criticisms against the lawless jurisprudence of the U.S. Supreme Court; Potential political remedies for the unconstitutional balance of democracy in the country; Concerns toward institutional reforms of Christianity in the American culture.
ACCESSION #
17753898

 

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