TITLE

THE BIG ISSUE

PUB. DATE
July 2005
SOURCE
Crain's Cleveland Business;7/18/2005, Vol. 26 Issue 29, p11
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents the views of some Ohio people on whether or not journalists be forced to reveal their confidential sources. Nina McCollum of Middleburg Heights says that journalists should not be forced to reveal their confidential sources. Maureen Hough of Cleveland too says that journalists should not be forced to reveal their sources. John Lemieux of Cleveland says that the press was around in 1789 when the Constitution of the U.S. was formed. He adds that had the founding fathers intended to protect journalists, they would have said so in the First Amendment.
ACCESSION #
17741393

 

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