TITLE

GENDER BIAS IN JUVENILE JUSTICE PROCESSING: IMPLICATIONS OF THE JJDP ACT

AUTHOR(S)
Bishop, Donna M.; Frazier, Charles E.
PUB. DATE
January 1992
SOURCE
Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology;Winter1992, Vol. 82 Issue 4, p1162
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article discusses how the U.S. juvenile justice system deals with male and female offenders. The findings of early studies of the influence of gender on juvenile justice processing suggest that police officers, intake personnel, judges and other court officials supported a sexual double standard. Compared to their male counterparts, female status offenders were singled out for especially harsh protectionist treatment. At the same time, male delinquents received harsher and more punitive penalties than their female counterparts. Historical patterns of gender bias continue: Both female status offenders and male delinquents are differentially disadvantaged in the juvenile justice system. This state of affairs appears to reflect the continuation of protectionist policies toward female status offenders, as well as an attitude toward non-status offenders that sanctions differentially harsher penalties for males and more leniency toward females. It is important to highlight the fact that, had we not introduced contempt status as a variable in our analyses and looked for interaction effects, our findings would have suggested that gender bias in juvenile justice processing had diminished considerably.
ACCESSION #
17700853

 

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