TITLE

Loving and Doubting Journalism at the Same Time

AUTHOR(S)
Kennedy, George
PUB. DATE
June 2005
SOURCE
Nieman Reports;Summer2005, Vol. 59 Issue 2, p51
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article discusses findings of a study from the University of Missouri School of Journalism regarding public attitudes toward journalism. It showed that consumers of U.S. journalism respect, value and need it, even as they are skeptical about whether journalists live up to the standards of accuracy, fairness and respect for others that the profession sets for itself. Understanding of the press begins with nearly unanimous support for its fundamental role in sustaining democracy. Ninety-three percent agreed that the freedom of the press is important to the system of government. Only four percent disagreed. In this survey, the public also strongly supported the role most journalists see as their most important--as watchdog over the holders of power. Eighty-three percent of respondents agreed with the statement that it is important for journalists to press for access to information about the government, even when officials would like to keep it quiet. Eight percent disagreed. Two-thirds believed that newspaper and television journalism is valuable or very valuable to them. However, 70 percent said journalists are often influenced by powerful people and organizations, and 77 percent believe that the news is too negative, while half labeled it as too sensational.
ACCESSION #
17525982

 

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