TITLE

JUDICIAL ACTIVISM, JUDGES' SPEECH, AND MERIT SELECTION: CONVENTIONAL WISDOM AND NONSENSE

AUTHOR(S)
Bonventre, Vincent Martin
PUB. DATE
May 2005
SOURCE
Albany Law Review;2005, Vol. 68 Issue 3, p557
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses judicial activism, the First Amendment rights of judges and judicial selection in the U.S. Supreme Court. Definition of judicial activism; Discussion on the rights of judges to speech and expressive activities; Aim of the merit system in judicial selection.
ACCESSION #
17510514

 

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