TITLE

Why Change?

AUTHOR(S)
Lipp, Doug
PUB. DATE
April 2005
SOURCE
Leadership Excellence;Apr2005, Vol. 22 Issue 4, p15
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the need and importance of change even for successful organizations. Success gives rise to arrogance, and arrogance leads to complacency. Complacency comes in many forms. For example, one tries to ride on one's success well beyond its effective lifespan. Getting beyond this kind of complacency means to be honest with self and recognize the importance of change. Two most important reasons for organizational change are: perhaps customers would like services that a company does not currently provide; possibly having the biggest or oldest name in the industry might not be the key to retaining current or attracting new customers or employees. So, to remain the successful, organizations must be remain open to change.
ACCESSION #
17441599

 

Related Articles

  • RE-ENGINEERING.  // Management Today;Jun2005, p24 

    This article reports that Business Process Reengineering (BPR) is a radical, back-to-the-drawing board approach to organisational change. Supporters argue that many businesses cling on to inherited systems and processes simply because those are the ones they have always used. In 1993, when belts...

  • Complexity leadership in bureaucratic forms of organizing: A meso model Uhl-Bien, Mary; Marion, Russ // Leadership Quarterly;Aug2009, Vol. 20 Issue 4, p631 

    Abstract: We consider Complexity Leadership Theory [Uhl-Bien, M., Marion, R., & McKelvey, B. (2007). Complexity Leadership Theory: Shifting leadership from the industrial age to the knowledge era. The Leadership Quarterly.] in contexts of bureaucratic forms of organizing to describe how adaptive...

  • INITIATING DIVERGENT ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE: THE ENABLING ROLE OF ACTORS' SOCIAL POSITION. BATTILANA, JULIE // Academy of Management Annual Meeting Proceedings;2007, Vol. 2007 Issue 1, p1 

    The article discusses ways to initiate organizational change within a business. Because institutions are social structures that are characterized by a high degree of resilience, they are often difficult to change. This difficulty is compounded by the fact that actors in a position to create...

  • Cautionary tales from the Kalahari: how hunters become herders (and may have trouble changing back again). Hurst, David K. // Executive (19389779);Aug1991, Vol. 5 Issue 3, p74 

    Much has been written about organizational change, but often with little insight into why established organizations are so stable and difficult to transform. In this article David Hurst uses the experience of the Kalahari Bushmen to bring an additional perspective to the problem. He draws the...

  • Beyond Change Management: A Multilevel Investigation of Contextual and Personal Influences on Employees' Commitment to Change. Herold, David M.; Fedor, Donald B.; Caldwell, Steven D. // Journal of Applied Psychology;Jul2007, Vol. 92 Issue 4, p942 

    The extent to which attitudes toward organizational changes may be affected by contextual (other changes going on) and personal (self-efficacy) factors was investigated with a multilevel design involving 25 different changes. Even after aspects of the change itself were controlled, the...

  • PROCESS-BASED ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE: FROM CHINA TOWARDS A GLOBAL MODEL. Martinsons, Maris G.; Hempel, Paul S. // Academy of Management Proceedings & Membership Directory;2001, pE1 

    Process-based organizational change has attracted considerable attention in recent decades, with the rise of total quality management (TQM) being followed by the emergence of business process reengineering (BPR). Since contextual factors can influence both the adoption and results of these...

  • UNDERSTANDING ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE: A SCHEMATIC PERSPECTIVE. CHUNG-MING LAU; WOODMAN, RICHARD W. // Academy of Management Journal;Apr95, Vol. 38 Issue 2, p537 

    The construct of change schema is developed and its possible dimensions explained. Using data from two samples and both quantitative and qualitative methods, we found that locus of control and organizational commitment were related to specific dimensions of the construct. Dogmatism was not...

  • On the Genesis of Organizational Forms: Evidence from the Market for Disk Arrays. McKendrick, David G.; Carroll, Glenn R. // Organization Science;Nov/Dec2001, Vol. 12 Issue 6, p661 

    This article asks a basic question of organizational evolution: When and where will a new organizational form emerge? Using a definition of organizational forms as external identity codes, we focus on two answers drawn from contemporary organization theory. The first holds that formal...

  • INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE: CAUSAL STRUCTURE IN THEORY AND RESEARCH. Markus, M. Lynne; Robey, Daniel // Management Science;May88, Vol. 34 Issue 5, p583 

    This article concerns theories about why and how information technology affects organizational life. Good theory guides research, which, when applied, increases the likelihood that information technology will be employed with desirable consequences for users, organizations, and other interested...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sign out of this library

Other Topics