TITLE

THE AGENCY LAW ORIGINS OF THE NECESSARY AND PROPER CLAUSE

AUTHOR(S)
Natelson, Robert G.
PUB. DATE
December 2004
SOURCE
Case Western Reserve Law Review;Winter2004, Vol. 55 Issue 2, p243
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Looks into the agency law origins of the necessary and proper clause. Purpose of the Clause; Premise about the relative reliability of various kinds of historical evidence; Examination of the drafting history of the Clause at the federal constitutional convention; Details of the survey on the development and content of the agency concepts that the drafters intended the Necessary and Proper Clause to embody.
ACCESSION #
17439296

 

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