TITLE

Covering the third world [or trying to]

AUTHOR(S)
Meisler, Stanley
PUB. DATE
November 1978
SOURCE
Columbia Journalism Review;Nov/Dec1978, Vol. 17 Issue 4, p34
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article discusses the difficulties faced by American journalists who cover third-world countries in the late-1970s. The third world creates problems for foreign correspondents and little understood by most readers. Their greatest difficulty comes from working in societies that have no understanding of the needs and demands of an unrestricted press. The national press in these countries never offends the government. As third-world leaders like to say, their press is enlisted in the battle for development. Rather than stand on the sidelines and snipe at government policies, editors and reporters help carry them out. In the early 1960s, when American correspondents first came to the third world, the officials often tried to hide their frustration and fury so as not to offend the powerful and generous nation that these journalists represented. But the third world has gotten over that; nowadays, ministries of information frequently react to stories they find displeasing by adminishing, expelling or jailing correspondents. This kind of trouble is so widespread that it is hardly noticed.
ACCESSION #
17367906

 

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