TITLE

Aḥmad Ibn Ḥanbal and the Qur'an

AUTHOR(S)
Melchert, Christopher
PUB. DATE
July 2004
SOURCE
Journal of Qur'anic Studies;2004, Vol. 6 Issue 2, p22
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Ahmad ibn Hanbal (d. Baghdad, 241/855) was the central, defining figure of Sunnism in the earlier ninth century CE. He was a major collector and critic of hadīth, as well as stories of early renunciants, and his collected opinions would form the literary basis of the Hanbalī school of law. Men would assert as a badge of orthodoxy that their creed was Ahmad's (e.g. Muzanī Tabirī Ashcarī). He famously resisted the Inquisition of Maᔐmūn and his successors, refusing to acknowledge that the Qur'an was created. Ahmad's ideas about the Qur'an are found in collections of his answers to questions (masāᴐil), in biographies (both of him personally and of his followers), and in his Musnad. They show a devotion above all to the liturgical use of the Qur'an; for example, how it should be recited aloud, how it should be integrated with the ritual prayer. He did not tend to infer the law directly from the Qur'an, but from hadīth, and put together his own version of the text (qirāᴐa), although it is not preserved. (The report that he assembled a huge Qur'anic commentary is doubtful.) Therefore, it was not mainly as a record of Islamic law that Ahmad defended the transcendence of the Qur'an but more directly as the basis of Islamic piety.
ACCESSION #
17323777

 

Related Articles

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics