TITLE

Branding from the brain's point of view

AUTHOR(S)
Mitchell, Alan
PUB. DATE
May 2005
SOURCE
Brand Strategy;May2005, Issue 192, p9
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Examines how neuroscience can contribute to the marketer's brand strategy. Dream of plugging consumers into an MRI scanner, showing them ad and seeing which parts of their brains light up; Prediction that neuroscience will become flavor of the month for a while, as agencies look for a new killer application selling point to clients.
ACCESSION #
17248332

 

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