TITLE

A customer-focused approach can bring the current marketing mix into the 21st century

AUTHOR(S)
Dev, Chekitan S.; Schultz, Don E.
PUB. DATE
January 2005
SOURCE
Marketing Management;Jan/Feb2005, Vol. 14 Issue 1, p16
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The four Ps are no longer a relevant marketing mix because they don't reflect 21st century market realities. This article focuses on a new customer-centric marketing mix that includes solutions, information, value, and access. Using this model to respond to customer questions, marketers can respond better to current market dynamics. They also will be better able to offer new opportunities that lead to different conclusions--changing the way we relate to customers.
ACCESSION #
17137446

 

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