SEC approves changes to MSRB rule G-23

Hume, Lynn
March 1999
Bond Buyer;03/30/99, Vol. 327 Issue 30609, p5
Trade Publication
Reports that the United States Securities and Exchange Commission has approved changes to Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board Rule G-23.


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