TITLE

EDITOR'S NOTE

PUB. DATE
December 1979
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Winter79/80, Vol. 58 Issue 2, p216
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article discusses issues concerning international politics. There is a similarity to the present overall situation and the 1939-41 period of conflict in the U.S. Then as now, U.S. citizens were spending much of their time airing their differences about how their country got into a most difficult position, how much other countries were to be blamed, and so on. In 1941 the dithering stopped, the country did take hold of its problems, and emerged united, effective, and with a new consciousness of strength and what it stood for. The challenge then was monolithic, and debate in the end was terminated by external attack. Today the problems are manifold, and debate on them will not cease, especially in an election year. More than any other single factor, the role of the U.S. in the world hinges on getting on top of its energy situation. Whatever the ultimate possibilities for all kinds of energy sources, the immediate key to this is conservation, a return at least for the time being to traditions of self-denial, sacrifice of personal pleasures, and sharing of burdens that were writ large in the years after 1941 and in the eighteenth century as they have not been recently. The turbulent politics of the Middle East and economic pressures should be as compelling today in this direction as the more obvious threats of those earlier times.
ACCESSION #
17043870

 

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