TITLE

LE CONGO: FORMATION SOCIALE ET MODE DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ÉCONOMIQUE

AUTHOR(S)
Whitaker, Jennifer Seymour; Bryant, Elizabeth H.
PUB. DATE
April 1976
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Apr1976, Vol. 54 Issue 3, p628
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This section presents an overview of the book Le Congo: Formation Sociale Et Mode De Développement Économique, by Hughes Bertrand.
ACCESSION #
17005983

 

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