TITLE

DID YOU KNOW?

PUB. DATE
May 2005
SOURCE
Scholastic News -- Edition 4;5/9/2005, Vol. 67 Issue 23, p2
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents information on the duck that waddled and built a nest in front of the U.S. Treasury headquarters in Washington D.C. Information on the number of eggs that the duck is nesting.
ACCESSION #
16987972

 

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