TITLE

GM teams its brands with specific Olympic sports

AUTHOR(S)
Halliday, Jean
PUB. DATE
March 1999
SOURCE
Advertising Age;3/22/1999, Vol. 70 Issue 12, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article reports on the system developed by General Motors Corp. (GM) to leverage the marketing impact of its sponsorship deal with the U.S. Olympic Committee in 1999. With it, the company expects to improve its previous low level of consumer awareness for its sponsorship of the 1996 U.S. Olympic Team and Summer Games in Atlanta, Georgia. The plan is based on an internal study of consumers and from it GM has selected car brands that will get the most advertising support keyed to a specific sport. GM paid an estimated $300 million to be the official domestic car and truck sponsor of the U.S. Olympic Team through the 2008 Games and an estimated $600 million for domestic auto exclusivity on the coverage of NBC through that year.
ACCESSION #
1693462

 

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