TITLE

Nike in talks to become player in 2000 Olympics

AUTHOR(S)
Ross, Chuck; Friedman, Wayne; Kramer, Louise
PUB. DATE
March 1999
SOURCE
Advertising Age;03/22/99, Vol. 70 Issue 12, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article reports on the discussions started between Nike and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in 1999, to forge a broad relationship that could make the sports brand a major advertiser during the Sydney Summer Games in 2000. According to an executive familiar with the talk, Nike could become an official Olympic sponsor, provided it could use Olympic athletes in commercials shown during the Games. The IOC forbid the use of Olympic athletes in commercials in the Games unless a waiver is granted.
ACCESSION #
1692684

 

Related Articles

  • Nike in talks to become player in 2000 Olympics. Ross, Chuck; Friedman, Wayne; Kramer, Louise // Advertising Age;3/22/1999, Vol. 70 Issue 12, p1 

    This article reports on the discussions started between Nike and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in 1999, to forge a broad relationship that could make the sports brand a major advertiser during the Sydney Summer Games in 2000. According to an executive familiar with the talk, Nike...

  • Olympians Engage In Horseplay For Adidas And 180. Michaelson, Elizabeth // SHOOT;09/08/2000, Vol. 41 Issue 36, p14 

    Reports on television commercials for the 2000 Olympic Games. Description of the commercials; Visual effects; Sound design; Adidas commercial; Cedar Point Amusement Park; Hallmark Cards.

  • OLYMPIC ATHLETES AND HEROISM IN ADVERTISING: GENDERED CONCEPTS OF VALOR? Goodman, J. Robyn; Duke, Lisa L.; Sutherland, John // Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly;Summer2002, Vol. 79 Issue 2, p374 

    Presents a study which analyzed the television advertisements aired during the telecast of the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, New South Wales by the National Broadcasting Company. Examination of the advertisers' use of Jungian-based concepts of heroism and gendered concepts of heroism;...

  • NBC sells half of Olympics time.  // Electronic Media;03/01/99, Vol. 18 Issue 9, p39 

    Announces NBC's sale of 50% of its 2000 Olympics advertising inventory to 11 major sponsors.

  • AT&T shootout: Agencies seek Olympic gold. Petrecca, Laura; Elkin, Tobi; Chura, Hillary; Teinowitz, Ira // Advertising Age;8/7/2000, Vol. 71 Issue 33, p1 

    The article examines the television advertising campaign of AT and T Corp. that is scheduled to air during the Olympic Games in September 2000. Key issues discussed include a description of the key features of the campaign, the primary target markets for the commercials and the creative credits...

  • NBC GOES FOR GOLD. Dempsey, John // Daily Variety;09/11/2000, Vol. 269 Issue 6, p15 

    Reports that National Broadcasting Co. has sold out all of the commercial spots on the 2000 Olympic Games. Amount that the company raised in gross network sales; Company's reduction of the commercial time within each hour from the nine-and-a-half minutes during the 1996 Atlanta Games to nine...

  • Samsung, Johnson Sprint in Olympic Ads. Wasserman, Todd // Brandweek;06/26/2000, Vol. 41 Issue 26, p4 

    Reports the TV advertisement of the telecommunications division of Samsung which featured Michael Johnson, a track and field athlete for its 2000 Olympic Games sponsorship. Cost of the TV advertisement; Features of the TV advertisement.

  • Coke: 'Share. Something. Real.'. Sampey, Kathleen // Adweek Eastern Edition;9/18/2000, Vol. 41 Issue 38, p6 

    Focuses on the television commercials developed by Cliff Freeman and Partners for Coca-Cola Co. during the 2000 Olympic Games. Campaign theme; Target audience; Philosophical, introspective content.

  • Cable takes a shot at Olympic ad glory. Fineberg, Seth // Electronic Media;07/31/2000, Vol. 19 Issue 31, p14 

    Reports on opportunities for cable television operators in the United States that sell local advertising time for the 2000 Olympic Games. Agreements between National Broadcasting Co. Inc. and cable operators; Demand for advertising time at the local level; Advertisers' spending on the Olympics.

Share

Read the Article

Other Topics