TITLE

Gwendolyn Brooks: Celebrating Black America

PUB. DATE
May 2005
SOURCE
Literary Cavalcade;May2005, Vol. 57 Issue 8, p11
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on a poet Gwendolyn Brooks. Gwendolyn Brooks (1917-2000) published her first poetry collection, A Street in Bronzeville, in 1945. The first African-American to be awarded the Pulitzer Prize, Brooks was both a master of various poetic forms and a chronicler and celebrant of black American life. In 1953, she (Brooks) served as a poetry judge for The Scholastic Art and Writing Awards. An example of her poetry is The Bean Eaters, published in the year 1960.
ACCESSION #
16846750

 

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