TITLE

Humanistic values

AUTHOR(S)
Adams, Maynard
PUB. DATE
October 2003
SOURCE
International Journal for Philosophy of Religion;Oct2003, Vol. 54 Issue 2, p65
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article discusses the need of a culture and way of life in which humanistic values and ways of thought are dominant. The author argues that something is wrong with trying to understand values in utilitarian terms and hence, there is a need of a different approach. People at a certain level of maturity and rationality recognize that they are by their nature under a normative requirement to define and to live a life that is worthy as human beings. According to the author, some prominent humanistic values are: self-respect and the respect of others; loving and being loved; meaningful experiences and relationships; meaningful activities and work that involves self-expression and self-fulfillment; and a stable social order with justice and beauty. He suggests a need of a culture that roots people in a historical and a metaphysical context that makes sense of existence and sustains spirit, a culture in which the call of the universal and the transcendent that lifts people out of their self-centeredness and orients them toward higher values is clear and compelling for all.
ACCESSION #
16823589

 

Related Articles

  • Humanistic values. Adams, Maynard // International Journal for Philosophy of Religion;Oct2003, Vol. 54 Issue 2, p65 

    This article discusses the need of a culture and way of life in which humanistic values and ways of thought are dominant. The author argues that something is wrong with trying to understand values in utilitarian terms and hence, there is a need of a different approach. People at a certain level...

  • CLASSIFICATIONS OF VALUE: Various Classifications of Value. Sheng, C. L. // Utilitarian General Theory of Value;1998, p75 

    The article offers the author's insights regarding the several classifications of value. The author states that the classification is the same with the classification of concrete objects. He says that he classifies values as a theory of moral philosophy in his book on utilitarianism. He mentions...

  • FEATURES OF MORAL IN THE IMMORAL ENVIRONMENT (SEARCH OF SPIRITUAL VALUES IN EVERYDAY LIFE). Valerievna, Snarskaya Ekaterina // Theory & Practice of Social Development;2013, Issue 9, p1 

    The objective of the article is to define the possibility of the moral phenomena existence in the everyday life sphere. The everyday routine is considered by the majority of researchers as something utilitarian, una-ble to produce and implement the moral values, and, therefore, alien to the...

  • preference utilitarianism Philosophy.  // Dictionary of Theories;2002, p428 

    A definition of the term "preference utilitarianism" is presented. It is a term in philosophy which refers to version of utilitarianism which contrasts with both hedonistic utilitarianism and ideal utilitarianism by specifying the end to be pursued in terms neither of pleasure nor of other...

  • rule utilitarianism Philosophy.  // Dictionary of Theories;2002, p471 

    A definition of the term "rule utilitarianism" is presented. It relates to a theory related to Philosophy. It refers to a theory also known as indirect utilitarianism. The theory asserts that one's duty is not to aim for the act which will produce the best overall consequences, but to follow...

  • A REAL UNITY OF THEM ALL. Gilbert, Margaret // Monist;Apr2009, Vol. 92 Issue 2, p268 

    No abstract available.

  • David Friedman and Libertarianism: A Critique. Block, Walter E. // Libertarian Papers;12/ 1/2011, Vol. 3 Issue 31-38, p1 

    The article offers information on the philosophy of libertarianism and utilitarianism relative to the free economy of states. It presents the perspectives, notions and writings of David Friedman on the principle of libertarianism. Moreover, it criticizes the views of Friedman on libertarianism...

  • It's the Thought that Counts. Howard-Snyder, Frances // Utilitas;Nov2005, Vol. 17 Issue 3, p265 

    Agnes's brakes fail. Should she continue straight into the busy intersection or should she swerve into the field? Add to the story; what Agnes does not and cannot know, that continuing into the intersection will cause no harm, whereas swerving into the apparently empty field will cause a death....

  • Are you a pushover? Campbell, Sherrie // Charlotte Post;12/12/2013, Vol. 39 Issue 14, p1B 

    The article offers tips on how to be more assertive and to learn to say no including self-respect, express one's self and to speak up one's opinions.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics