TITLE

The logic and language of Nirvana: A contemporary interpretation

AUTHOR(S)
K�gler, Peter
PUB. DATE
April 2003
SOURCE
International Journal for Philosophy of Religion;Apr2003, Vol. 53 Issue 2, p93
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
In contrast to historically oriented approaches, this paper tackles the concept of Nirvana from the perspective of contemporary philosophy of language. It focuses on four propositions: Nirvana exists; Nirvana does not exist; Nirvana exists and does not exist; Nirvana neither exists nor does not exist. The Buddha's rejection of these propositions is interpreted by means of explicit and conditional definitions of existence. Stalnaker's notion of pragmatic presupposition provides an explanation why the propositions are without meaning. After comparing the word ``Nirvana'' with indexicals, proper names and theoretical terms, it is finally asked what linguistic function the word has.
ACCESSION #
16823581

 

Related Articles

  • The logic and language of Nirvāna: A contemporary interpretation. Kügler, Peter // International Journal for Philosophy of Religion;Apr2003, Vol. 53 Issue 2, p93 

    In contrast to historically oriented approaches, this paper tackles the concept of Nirvāna from the perspective of contemporary philosophy of language. It focuses on four propositions: Nirvāna exists; Nirvāna does not exist; Nirvāna exists and does not exist; Nirvāna neither...

  • The Last Blade of Grass? Werner, Karel // Middle Way;May2008, Vol. 83 Issue 1, p21 

    The article discusses the concept of salvation as taught by various religions. It focuses on why some Boddhisattva aspirants vow to not enter nirvana until all beings also gain entry. Different teachings and forms of punishment and salvation are taught in Christianity, Judaism, Islam, and...

  • II The Three Characteristics. Cheetham, Eric // Middle Way;Feb2006, Vol. 80 Issue 4, p213 

    The article discusses the formula called the Three Characteristics or otherwise known as Three Signs of Being. The Three Characteristics was translated in English and in the Sanskrit version it was changed to the Three Seals of the Dharma, the Dharma mudra, and the word Nirvana was added to it....

  • NIRVANA. Lewis, James R. // Death & Afterlife Book;2001, p264 

    A definition of the term "nirvana" is presented. Nirvana was introduced in Buddhist scriptures in the second or third century B.C. which signified accomplishment of ultimate enlightenment. In Sanskrit language, nirvana is literally defined as extinction. It states that freeing oneself from...

  • POPCORN SUTRAS.  // Yoga Journal;Sep/Oct2005, Issue 190, p131 

    Reviews the book "Cinema Nirvana: Enlightenment Lessons From the Movies," by Dean Sluyter.

  • FORGET HAPPINESS. McLEOD, KEN // Tricycle: The Buddhist Review;Spring2014, Vol. 23 Issue 3, p82 

    The article offers critical analysis of two verses from the poem "Thirty-Seven Practices of a Bodhisattva," by Tokme Zongpo. There are two goals in the pursuit of happiness, namely frivolous and unrealistic. The four spiritual longings that are considered escapist reactions to challenges...

  • Budismo tibetano. LANGLEY, MYRTLE // Religión (9781405350570);2002, p26 

    No abstract available.

  • Religion as an Investment: Comparing the Contributions and Volunteer Frequency among Christians, Buddhists, and Folk Religionists. Hung-Lin Tao; Powen Yeh // Southern Economic Journal;Jan2007, Vol. 73 Issue 3, p770 

    The magnitude of the reward of an afterlife promised in the case of Christians is significantly greater than that in relation to both Buddhism and Taiwanese folk religions. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether these differences in the promised rewards of an afterlife across...

  • "Pre-Linguistic Meaning: A Pragmatist Defense". Morse, Don // Americana: E-journal of American Studies in Hungary;2008, Vol. 4 Issue 2, p9 

    The article focuses on the philosophy of philosopher William James. According to James, philosophers tend to get addicted to their own concepts about the real world and are mistaken when they attribute their own conceptual experiences in the daily life, to reality. Pre-linguistic meaning is...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics