TITLE

Antibiotic prevention of pneumococcal infections in asplenic hosts: admission of insufficiency

AUTHOR(S)
de Montalembert, M.; Lenoir, G.
PUB. DATE
January 2004
SOURCE
Annals of Hematology;Jan2004, Vol. 83 Issue 1, p18
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Asplenic and hyposplenic patients have an increased risk for overwhelming pneumococcal infections, even several decades after splenectomy. Pneumococcal vaccination and daily oral administration of penicillin V are recommended to prevent such infections, 2–5 years after splenectomy, and for at least 5 years in children affected with sickle cell disease. In order to assess whether the infectious risk is actually known and prevented, we interviewed physicians (belonging to a general practitioner and pediatrician network) who followed patients having undergone a splenectomy and/or children with sickle cell disease under 5 years of age. We received replies from 104 physicians monitoring 152 patients replied. Potential infection risk was not known for 28% of the asplenic patients and 40% of the children with sickle cell disease. Only 75% of the asplenic patients and 36% of the children with sickle cell disease had been vaccinated against pneumococcus. Of the patients who had undergone splenectomy, 27% had been treated with an antibiotic after surgery and 60% had discontinued it, the vast majority of them during the same year. Of the children with sickle cell disease, 48% were not receiving an antibiotic. This study demonstrates that risk of infections in asplenic patients is widely misunderstood, indicating the urgent need to improve their management.
ACCESSION #
16820987

 

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