TITLE

Storm Watch

AUTHOR(S)
Schneider, David
PUB. DATE
May 2005
SOURCE
American Scientist;May/Jun2005, Vol. 93 Issue 3, p216
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the status of hurricane and storm activity in the U.S. in 2005. Role of global warming in the occurrence of hurricane; Evolution of storms and hurricanes; Extent of the damage caused by hurricanes.
ACCESSION #
16747517

 

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