TITLE

Job-Based Health Insurance in 2000: Premiums Rise Sharply While Coverage Grows

PUB. DATE
March 2001
SOURCE
Benefits Quarterly;2001 First Quarter, Vol. 17 Issue 1, p80
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on a report in the September to October 2000 issue of "Health Affairs" on the efforts of employers to protect employees from rising insurance premiums and the growth of the insurance coverage being provided for them in order to improve employee retention rates. Insurance premiums increased by 8.3% between the spring of 1999 and the spring of 2000, more than 2.5 times the overall rate of inflation in the U.S. The average monthly cost for single coverage was $202. Employees did not pay more for their monthly premiums for single and family coverage in 2000 than in 1999.
ACCESSION #
16709524

 

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