TITLE

Going with the flow

AUTHOR(S)
Fisher, Richard
PUB. DATE
March 2005
SOURCE
Engineer (00137758);3/29/2005, Vol. 293 Issue 7671, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that U.S. engineers have built a fuel cell with no membrane that mimics the flow of toothpaste being squeezed from a tube. The device could prove more efficient than conventional fuel cell designs for use in consumer electronics and military devices, and costless to produce. Paul Kenis, a researcher from the University of Illinois, explained that a key advantage of the fuel cell is that it can use more reactive alkaline chemistry, which is superior to conventional acidic systems in the same way that alkaline batteries perform better.
ACCESSION #
16659414

 

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