TITLE

When Children EAT What They SEE

PUB. DATE
April 2005
SOURCE
Scholastic Parent & Child;Apr/May2005, Vol. 12 Issue 5, p76
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the negative influence TV commercials have on young children's diet. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, more than one in five children in the United States are overweight. And the problem is creeping downward on the age scale, threatening even preschool children. At the same time, type 2 diabetes — once called adult-onset diabetes — is affecting children as young as 4, while attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is also on the rise.
ACCESSION #
16649095

 

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