TITLE

EFFECT OF PHYSICAL TRAINING ON INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION

AUTHOR(S)
Ericsson, B.; Haeger, K.; Lindell, S.E.
PUB. DATE
March 1970
SOURCE
Angiology;Mar1970, Vol. 21 Issue 3, p188
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Studies the effects of physical training on intermittent claudication by researchers from Malmo, Sweden. Necessity for any treatment to elucidate that it can increase the blood flow to the limb over and above the maximum flow that can be obtained in its absence to prove its therapeutic value; Evidence showing that exercise can cause a strong local vasodilation in the exercising muscle; Capability of muscular exercise to widen collateral vessels.
ACCESSION #
16515208

 

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